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A new forecourt price war?

A new forecourt price war?

 

A new forecourt price war will lead to the lowest petrol prices since early 2011, the RAC has predicted.

 

 

Forecourt prices are expected to plunge by almost 4p a litre in the next fortnight following a drop in wholesale costs.

The motoring organisation has urged supermarkets and oil giants to pass on further savings to consumers more quickly since last month.

RAC head of external affairs Pete Williams said: ‘Fuel retailers have clearly demonstrated the transparency of their operations by cutting more off a litre of fuel than many people will be able to remember. As well as saving people hard-earned cash at the pumps, this level of transparency has no doubt created a lot of goodwill with their customers.

‘Motorists often complain that prices seem to go up far faster than they come down, but this autumn is proof that this is not necessarily the case.’

But Edmund King, president of the AA, said: “Pump prices could come down further if the price gap between towns with competitive supermarkets and those without was to close.”